Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Thirty Two Weeks Today :)

Today I am officially EIGHT MONTHS! She will be here soon! Here is what is happening this week:

Courtesy of What To Expect!

Week 32 of Pregnancy
Your baby is practicing survival skills like sucking and breathing, while your uterus is practicing some Braxton Hicks contractions.

Your Baby in Week 32 of Pregnancy
What's up with your baby? She's starting to get ready for her big debut, tipping the scales at almost four pounds and topping out at just about 19 inches. In these past few weeks, it's all about practice, practice, practice as she hones the skills she'll need to thrive outside the womb — from swallowing and breathing to kicking and sucking. And speaking of sucking, your little one has been able to suck her thumb for a while now. Something else to note: As more and more fat accumulates under your baby's skin, she's becoming less transparent and more opaque.

Learn more about your baby in week 32 and a baby's position in the womb.

Your Body in Week 32 of Pregnancy
This week, your body may start prepping for delivery day by flexing its muscles — literally. If you feel your uterus bunching or hardening periodically, those are practice contractions, otherwise known as Braxton Hicks. These rehearsals (typically experienced earlier and with more intensity in women who've been pregnant before) feel like a tightening sensation that begins at the top of your uterus and then spreads downward, lasting from 15 to 30 seconds (though they can sometimes last two minutes or more). How do you know these contractions aren't the real thing? They’ll stop if you change position (try getting up if you’re lying down or walking if you've been sitting).

Learn more about your body in week 32 and Braxton Hicks contractions.

Week 32 Pregnancy Symptoms
Flatulence: To minimize that gassy feeling, aim for eating six small meals a day (versus three large ones) so that you don’t strain your digestive system (which is being taxed enough by your growing belly bearing down on it).

Bloating: Your slower metabolism (which has slowed down to give the food you eat more time to enter the bloodstream and nourish your baby) can cause bloating. Stick to your pregnancy diet and drink plenty of water to avoid constipation (see below), which aggravates bloating.

Constipation: Your growing uterus is cramping your bowels, making them sluggish and irregular. Get some regular exercise (anything helps, from brisk walks to prenatal yoga), and drink up!

Occasional faintness or dizziness: Feeling faint or light-headed can be a result of any number of things, including low blood sugar. Don’t forget to carry a protein-and-carb-rich snack in your bag to munch on when you feel dizzy. Granola bars, trail mix, or soy chips are a great choice, and may keep light-headedness at bay.

Hemorrhoids: Hemorrhoids, which are actually varicose veins in the rectum, can be a pain in the rear (literally!), especially if you spend a lot of time sitting. Ice packs or witch hazel can soothe, as can warm baths.

Leg cramps: Just as you’re ready to drift off to dreamland you may feel a painful spasm in your calves — though no one is quite sure what causes the pain (or why it’s worse at night). One theory: a lack of calcium and magnesium in your diet. Ask your practitioner if taking an extra calcium supplement is a good idea, and be certain you’re devouring your dose of daily dairy (bring on the cheese and yogurt!).

Itchy abdomen: That swelling belly is getting itchier and itchier, as the skin stretches and dries out. If slathering on creams and moisturizers doesn't help, try calamine or some other type of anti-itch lotion that soothe more-stubborn cases. Or add oatmeal to your bath and have a soak in warm (not hot) water.

Enlarged breasts and colostrum: As your breasts get bigger in the third trimester, they may also leak a yellowish fluid called colostrum, which is the precursor to breast milk. This liquid, packed with protein and antibodies, is the first milk your baby will get. If the leaks are getting uncomfortable, try wearing nursing pads.

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